Wells in the Parish

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WELLS IN THE PARISH

Wells sunk into the gravel and sand on which the village and Parish is built, provided an adequate water supply for Clifford and Milcote. By 1930, some houses were connected to the Stratford Water Supply, and before the 2nd World War, the whole village was so connected, though some wells were still in use in 1955.

Details of wells in Clifford Manor Estate (according to the Auction Particulars of 25th June 1951) (and according to the memory of Nigel Radbourne)

Shipston Road Monks Barn Farm – water from a well is pumped from the yard up to a tank in the roof

Field past Springfield House going towards Shipston on right hand side of road -Pump where two cottages used to be

“The Thistles” water from a well is pumped to a tank in the roof.

“Gilead” - well at back near house.

“Woodlands” - well at back

“Badger's Croft” according to Nigel, the well here is 80/90' deep

“Farnicombe” - – well probably also at the back.

The village Nos. 38, 39, 40, 41 – water from pump in garden

Nos. 31, 32, 33, 34 water from pump adjoining No. 32

Nos. 49, 50 - water is obtained from a pump at the rear of 'the Carpenter's shop' adjoining (Carpenter's house is now Prospect House – Nigel also thinks there is a well in the front garden of one of the Charity houses next door)

Nos. 28 – outside washhouse with sink, copper and pump. now believed to be at the back of No. 31

“Eastcote” adjoining No. 50 - well water (was No. 49 but now part of Prospect House)

Cottage No. 45 – well water from a pump

Nos. 46, 47 – water from pump in garden (Nigel is pretty certain this is in No. 46's garden)

Nos. 42, 43, 44 – water from pump in garden of No. 43

Nos. 14, 15, 16, 17 – share a well with pump in garden of No. 14 (sewerage pipe now goes through it!)

Post Office – water from a well beneath the shop

No. 13 – water from a pump in yard

Welford Road Rectory Farm - well in yard.

1, The Nashes – scullery with copper, sink and pump.

Campden Road Cold Comfort Farm – water from a pump and additional supply from private estate reservoir at Martins Hill

(These are some descriptions in these Particulars of “soft water pump” - whatever that is!!)

The Manor – Engine room containing Lister 4.h.p engine driving Lee-Howell compactom pump, pumping water from the river to a reservoir on Martins Hill

Manor Cottage according to Nigel, there is a well outside the Manor-side of the cottage underneath the present patio.

The Rectory – well by the outside steps leading to “stable!”

Nos. 20,21,22,23 well somewhere in back gardens.

The Lodge – according to Nigel, one well by the side of the house, and two by the garages with tank under

Nos 18 & 19 – - Maisie Wilks could remember one, but not where, when she and John lodged with Sister Hawkins

No. 1 – according to Nigel, well in garden which might also serve No. 2.

The Close – Definitely one somewhere

Barn Flats – well at the back

The Laurels well at back.

No. 54 well at back

No. 53 – well at back

Present allotments – well

Orchard House - Nigel is certain there is a well here somewhere.

The Hollies - do-

Clifford Forge – (by back door) well 80'90' deep

What Avril found out while 'canvassing' round the Parish and also from Nigel

Milcote

May Bank well

Aaron Leys – well centre back

Clifford Hill Farm – underground springs bubbling up to surface.

There is a cottage on the Greenway near Milcote Manor called “Well Cottage”!!!!!

Burnetts Cottages – well in field and this is pumped up also to Redhill House and Greville Mount

Milcote Hall – two wells

Campden Road

Sheep Leys Covert – – well

Willicote Pastures - there is a well by the front wall of 2 Willicote Farm Cottages,) very close to where it adjoins No. 1 Willicote Farm Cottages

Willicote House – previous owner says there was a well by side door, which was tested in 1980's and declared contaminated! (So was the well at Burnetts Cottages, but owners placed necessary equipment to kill bacteria etc. and Severn Trent Water Authority declared it safe to drink.)

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